ARQ News

Tie Dye event a success!

Wow! Our first ever tie-dye event went very very well. Our volunteers were inundated with participants from members of the public, the LGBT community and even some special guests from the local constabulary who came along to take part in the fun! We will do doing another one soon, so don’t worry if you missed out. In the interim enjoy the pictures below, can you spot your hands at work? 🌈🌈

Tie-Dye Workshop

Tie-Dye Workshop – Saturday 22nd June 10am-4pm – £5 per person – Bring your own garment and learn a fab new skill -Darlington ARQ, Unit 48, Cornmill Shopping Centre

50 Years of PRIDE!

Today (1/6/19) marks the start of June – PRIDE MONTH – and also marks 50 years of PRIDE. HAPPY PRIDE MONTH FROM ALL AT DARLINGTON ARQ A Brief History of Pride:

Today (1/6/19) marks the start of June – PRIDE MONTH – and also marks 50 years of PRIDE.

HAPPY PRIDE MONTH FROM ALL AT DARLINGTON ARQ

A Brief History of Pride:

In June 1969, the patrons of a New York City bar fought back against a discriminatory police raid. At the time, homosexuality — or “sodomy,” as it was referred to in the legal books — was still a crime. Men could be arrested for wearing drag, and women faced the same punishment if they were found wearing less than three pieces of “feminine clothing.” The harassment continued for years, infuriating the gay community. On June 28, 1969, the police arrived at the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar in Greenwich Village. However, the 200 patrons inside didn’t just sit down and wait to be arrested — they resisted, then rioted, sending the police a loud and clear message about their frustration with the status quo for LGBT individuals. If you ever wondered why Pride month takes place in June, now you know that it’s not just because of the generally pleasant weather. It’s historically relevant, too!

“Gay Pride” Was Coined in 1970

Gay communities around the country immediately latched on to the Stonewall riots as an event that brought attention to their cause. Just a year later, in 1970, a committee was formed to commemorate the riots. The problem? The committee didn’t have a name for the series of events it wanted to hold in honor of LGBTQ rights. It tossed around the slogan “gay power” for a bit, but when committee member L. Craig Schoonmaker suggested “gay pride,” everyone else agreed on the phrase right away. “People did not have power then; even now, we only have some,” 

You can read more about the history of pride in this very useful article: https://www.bustle.com/articles/166925-the-origins-of-pride-month-what-you-should-know-about-its-history